PSAAI

Philippine Society of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Inc.

FACTS ABOUT SKIN ALLERGIES

HIVES / URTICARIA

  • Urticaria (hives) are red, itchy, raised areas of the skin that can range in size and appear anywhere on your body. Most cases of hives are known as acute and go away within a few days or weeks, but some people suffer from chronic hives with symptoms that come and go for several months or years.
  • Hives can be an allergic reaction to medications, foods or insect bites. Hives can also result from non-allergic causes such as heat or exercise. Viral or bacterial infections can also trigger acute hives.
  • If the cause can be identified, you should avoid that trigger. However, the majority of chronic cases are not related to allergy.
  • Treatment of hives is often successful with oral antihistamines that control the itch and recurrence of the rash. Severe flare-ups may require taking corticosteroids to reduce inflammation.

 

ECZEMA

  • Atopic dermatitis (eczema) is a scaly, itchy rash that often affects the face, elbows and knees.
  • Eczema is a chronic skin condition that usually begins in infancy or early childhood and can be associated with food allergy, allergic rhinitis and asthma.
  • If you are allergic to certain foods, it can trigger eczema, especially in young children. Bacterial skin infections can cause flare-ups in children as well. Other potential triggers include animal dander, dust mites, sweating, or contact with irritants like wool or soap.

FACTS ABOUT FOOD ALLERGY

  • If you have a food allergy, your immune system overreacts to a particular protein found in that food. Symptoms can occur when coming in contact with just a tiny amount of the food.
  • The most common food allergens are the proteins in cow’s milk, eggs, peanuts, wheat, soy, fish, shellfish and tree nuts.
  • Many people who think they are allergic to a food may actually be intolerant to it. True food allergy can lead to a life-threatening reaction (anaplylaxis).
  • Allergic reactions to food normally occur within minutes of eating the trigger food, though they can sometimes appear a few hours later. Symptoms of a food allergy include hives/rash, vomiting, stomach cramps or diarrhea, swelling, difficulty breathing, choking.
  • There is currently no cure for food allergies; nor are there medicines to prevent reactions. Yet there are steps you should take to manage your condition. The most important of these is avoiding coming in contact with food proteins that can cause an allergic reaction. You should also read food labels to ensure that you don’t eat foods that contain foods to which you are allergic. Always ask about ingredients when eating at restaurants or when you are eating foods prepared by family or friends.

15th PSAAI Biennial Convention

 

 

Scientific Program

 

5-Sep-16      
7:00-8:00 Registration    
       
8:00-9:00  Opening Ceremony  
       
9:00-9:15 GLOBAL BURDEN OF ALLERGY
    Maria Carmela Agustin-Kasala, MD
       
9:15-10:00 CAN THE ALLERGY MARCH BE STOPPED? 
    Maria Cristina R.  Edquilag, MD
       
10:00-10:45  WHAT’S NEW IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS?
    John J. Oppenheimer, MD
       
10:45-11:00  Break / Visit to exhibits  
       
11:00-11:45 DO WE DEVELOP ALLERGIES IN UTERO?
    Aileen A. Elorde, MD
       
11:45-12:30 DO ALLERGIES BURN OUT IN OLD AGE?
    Ralph Mosges, MD
       
12:30-14:30  INDUSTRY SPONSORED LUNCHEON SYMPOSIA
       
14:30-15:00 FOOD ALLERGY: CAN WE PREVENT IT?
    Mary Anne R.  Castor, MD
    Jossie M, Rogacion, MD
15:00-15:30 DRUG ALLERGY AND HLA TYPE: IS THERE A CONNECTION?
    Maria Carmen D. Ang, MD
15:30-15:45 Q & A    
       
15:45-16:15 INDUSTRY SPONSORED TWILIGHT SYMPOSIA
       
16:15-17:00 HOW DO WE VACCINATE A CHILD WITH ALLERGIES?
    Julie C. de Leon, MD
       
       
       
6-Sep-16      
       
7:30-8:30  INDUSTRY SPONSORED BREAKFAST SYMPOSIA  
       
8:30-9:15 WHAT’S THE ROLE OF MICROBIOME IN ALLERGIC DISEASE?
    Felizardo N. Gatcheco, MD   
       
9:15-10:00  IS ASTHMA AN ALLERGY
    Professor Yi-Hsing Chen , MD, Phd
       
10:00-10:15 BREAK    
       
10:15-11:15 ROTOR MEMORIAL LECTURE
    Hiyasmin M. Lim, MD
       
11:15-12:00 PRIMARY IMMUNODEFICIENCIES: AN UPDATE WITH SPECIAL FOCUS ON ANTIBODY EFFECTS
    Viviana Moschese, MD
       
12:00-14:30  INDUSTRY SPONSORED LUNCHEON SYMPOSIA
       
14:30-15:15 HYPERSENSITIVITY TO ANTI-ALLERGIC PREPARATIONS: IS IT POSSIBLE?
    Ruby N. Foronda, MD
       
15:15-15:45 INDUSTRY SPONSORED TWILIGHT SYMPOSIA
       
15:45-16:30 FOOD ALLERGY vs. FOOD INTOLERANCE?WHAT IS THE SIGNIFICANCE OF IgE vs IgG? 
 
    Marysia Stella T. Recto, MD
       
16:30-16:45 CLOSING CEREMONY  

 

 
Pre-registration up to August 31, 2016
 
On site
Members
Php 2,500.00
Php 2,500.00
Non-members
Php 2,500.00
Php 3,000.00
Residents/Fellows in training
Php 2,000.00
Php 2,500.00
Government employees
(with certificate)
 
Php 2,000.00
 
Php 2,500.00
Foreign delegates
$150.00
$ 200.00

 

Bank Account Payment details:
BDO
Account Name: Philippine Society of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Inc.
Account number: 03820023830
 
PSAAI Secretariat
Email us: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Call us: +63 (2) 535-3220 
Call or Text us: +63 (915) 309-7900 or  +63 (915) 587-1475

 

 

 

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